York’s Railway Heritage

As a prelude to the York Conservation Alumni Association’s 2018 AGM on Saturday 14 July 2018, a healthy turnout of almost twenty alumni joined John Ives for a fascinating walking tour of some of York’s leading railway heritage.

Despite the unfortunate timing of the tour to coincide with the sweltering summer heat, the height of the tourist season, impatient traffic, and, worse still, streams of jovial punters heading to York Racecourse for the ‘John Smith’s Cup’, we were clearly in dependable hands.  John Ives is a Conservation Accredited Architect and a partner of York-based PPIY Architects Limited, as well as Chair of the City of York Council’s Conservation Area Appraisal Panel.  He has also been a leading figure in railway heritage for over the 40 years, due to having worked for British Rail’s Architects Department until its demise with privatisation in 1995, and as co-author of the York Station Conservation Development Strategy (2012).

In John’s introductory, and richly-illustrated, presentation, held in a spacious seminar room above Platform 8 of Thomas Presser’s highly impressive Grade II* Railway Station of 1877, it was evident that the Strategy Report of 2012 was a detailed audit of the city’s railway heritage, which spans nearly 200 years and numerous sites.  Who knew, for example, that the city has had three central railway stations in total, or that one of the country’s oldest extant water tower (built in 1839, Grade II listed) is tucked away in one of the station’s car parks!

YCAA alumni
John Ives (centre, to the rear), pointing out the rich history of the Railway Institute building, with the foundations of the Queen Street bridge behind. Source: Duncan Marks.

 

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YCAA Study Tour to Tallinn, Estonia, 7-11 September 2018

York Conservation Alumni Association is delighted to invite alumni, current students, friends and colleagues to join us on our Study Tour to Tallinn in Estonia for September 2018.

Tallinn, the capital of the Baltic country Estonia has a fascinating architectural mix that has been influenced by different rulers and conquerors through the history. On the study trip to Tallinn we’ll be mainly concentrating on three facets – the largely intact medieval old town, the Kalamaja region that boasts some of the best examples of wooden architecture from first republic period, and the vernacular architecture in Rocca al Mare Open Air Museum.

Tallinn Old Town
Tallinn’s medieval Old Town

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